Thank you RunningOnEmpty

I saw an interview tonight on PBS News Hour about why so many names didn't appear on the report. The Interview was with Nigel Duara:

http://www.google.com/#hl=en&sclient...186&bih=790

See:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/10/18..._n_1981596.html

Originally Posted By: Nigel Duara in Huffington Post

In 1972, a Pennsylvania Scouting executive wrote a memo recommending a case against a suspected abuser be dropped with the words: "If it don't stink, don't stir it."


Originally Posted By: Nigel Duara in Huffington Post

On the afternoon of Aug. 10, 1965, a distraught Louisiana mother walked into the Ouachita Parish Sheriff's Office. A 31-year-old scoutmaster, she told the chief criminal deputy, had raped one of her sons and molested two others.

Six days later, the scoutmaster sat down in the same station and confessed.

"I don't know an explanation, why we done it or I done it or wanted to do it or anything else it just an impulse I guess or something," the man told a sheriff's deputy.

The decision was made not to pursue charges. "This subject and Scouts were not prosecuted," a Louisiana Scouts executive wrote to national headquarters, "to save the name of Scouting."


Originally Posted By: Nigel Duara in Huffington Post

n Newton, Kan., in 1961, the county attorney had what he needed for a prosecution: Two men were arrested and admitted that they had molested Scouts in their care. But neither man was prosecuted.

The entire investigation, the county attorney wrote, was brought about with the cooperation of a local district Scouts executive, who was kept apprised of the investigation's progress into the men, who had affiliations with both the Scouts and the local YMCA.

"I came to the decision that to openly prosecute would cause great harm to the reputations of two organizations which we have involved here the Boy Scouts of America and the local YMCA," he wrote in a letter to a Kansas Scouting executive.


Puffer