Michael,

I would say it's worth referring this problem back to your therapist to see if some other medication might help you without affecting your sleep. It's so important to get good sleep.

But I wonder if there's also a second issue here. So many male survivors (including myself) go through a stage where they find it difficult to ask for the help they need. Reminds me of a joke where a guy comes into the doctor's office and says, "I have a serious pain in my arm", and the doctor asks, "Oh, sorry to hear that. How long have you had this?" And the guy replies, "Five years". Then a woman comes into the same doctor's office and says, "I have a serious pain in my arm", and the doctor asks, "Oh, sorry to hear that. How long have you had this?" And the woman replies, "Since this morning".

But beyond that it seems to me that survivors have difficulty asking for what they need, especially from a doctor or their T. Maybe we do that because abuse taught us long ago that whatever we needed would not be provided.

Anyway, I would just refer this problem back to whoever it was that prescribed the medication. Sometimes it takes awhile to get a regime of meds that works and allows us to function normally, but that should be our goal - to be able to function normally so we can face the task of recovery.

Much love,
Larry

_________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me
As I go walking my freedom highway.
Nobody living can make me turn back:
This land was made for you and me.
(Woody Guthrie)