This article deals with the response to another kind of abuse. Either way, it illustrates admirable qualities and the power of empowering decisions and actions.

3 DOCTORS VOWED AS TEENS TO STAY IN SCHOOL, OUT OF TROUBLE
The trio hopes to inspire others from inner-city neighborhoods to seek careers
in medicine.
By Damon Adams, AMNews staff Sept. 23/30, 2002.

Sampson Davis, MD, remembers sitting on a metal cot in a juvenile-detention
center and thinking how he would change if given another chance. He was 17,
a high school student arrested for committing an armed robbery with several
acquaintances on a street corner in Montclair, N.J. Sitting on that cot,
he realized he didn't want to end up like so many others from his inner-city
neighborhood -- selling drugs or doing time behind bars. The troubled teenager
also remembered how he and two friends had made a pact to go to college,
keep each other out of trouble and become doctors. After serving four weeks
in the juvenile home, he got his second chance. And he developed a stronger
commitment to turning his life around. He and his friends -- Rameck Hunt,
MD, and George Jenkins, DMD -- did indeed become doctors. Dr. Davis is an
emergency physician, Dr. Hunt is an internist and Dr. Jenkins is a dentist.
The three men still live in New Jersey. [...]

Read the entire article in American Medical News at AMEDNEWS.COM:

http://www.amednews.com/content/pick_02/prsb0923.htm