Resources for Military Sexual Assault


*** Immediately following a sexual assault, DO NOT shower, bathe, douche, eat, drink, smoke, urinate, or change clothing as this may potentially destroy evidence. If you do wish to remove your clothing, place each item in a separate paper bag to bring with you to SARC (Sexual Assault Response Coordinator) / Emergency Room, along with any other pieces of evidence. ***


U.S. Military


U.S. Dept. of Veterans Affairs Miltary Sexual Trauma

U.S. Dept. of Veterans Affairs VA Expands Access to Therapy for Sexual Assault (Article; 2014)

DoD / Military Sexual Assault | RAINN Link to Helpline does NOT work. Use link below.

DoD / Military Helpline




Books


Hunter, Mic; Honor Betrayed: Sexual Abuse in America’s Military
Barricade Books, 2007




Articles


Military Sexual Trauma


Military Sexual Trauma - Male Survivors Speak Out


Trapped in Trauma: Male Victims Confront Sexual Assault in the Military







At the MS Conference in 2014 there were presentations from both the DoD and the U.S. Dept. of Veteran's Affairs.

There are now two different options for reporting MST - Unrestricted Reporting and Restricted Reporting.


Unrestricted Reporting

Unrestricted Reporting is a complete report of a sexual assault to military and legal authorities that activates victims’ services, including medical treatment and counseling. Unrestricted Reporting also notifies chain of command and triggers an official investigation. The Unrestricted Reporting process can be started by chain of command, law enforcement, a SARC, or even healthcare providers. When they receive a report of sexual assault, the SARC will immediately assign a VA. At the victim's request, a healthcare provider will conduct a sexual assault forensic examination (SAFE), which may involve collecting evidence. Access to details about the incident will be given only to those personnel with a legitimate need to know, such as the VA, chain of command, medical personnel, and law en-forcement.

Currently military retirees, dependents, and other civilian victims may only use Unrestricted Reporting.



Restricted Reporting


Restricted Reporting was created in 2005 to allow victims to confidentially disclose details of their assault without triggering an official investigation or notifying chain of command. Like Unrestricted option, Restricted Reporting includes confidential medical treatment and counseling for the victim.

If they choose the Restricted Report option, service members must report the assault to a SARC, a VA, a healthcare provider, or a chaplain. Generally, the SARC, the assigned VA, and healthcare providers will not disclose confidential communications from a Restricted Report. But the SARC must report general information about the incident to command within 24 hours.

If the victim reports the sexual assault to a healthcare provider, the provider will offer appropriate treatment, and report the assault to the SARC instead of law enforcement or command. When they receive a report of sexual assault, the SARC will assign a VA to the victim. At the victim’s request, a healthcare provider will conduct a sexual assault forensic examination (SAFE), which may involve collecting evidence.


Making a Restricted report does not prevent victims from later filing an Unrestricted report for the same incident.


Active service is not a requirement for receiving medical / psychological care for MST.


Please PM broken links or outdated / updated information





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