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#311381 - 11/22/09 09:54 AM Abuse can lead to premature aging
Ken Singer, LCSW Offline
Moderator Emeritus
MaleSurvivor

Registered: 08/24/00
Posts: 5778
Loc: Lambertville, NJ USA
November 20, 2009 | Contact: Mark Hollmer | (401) 863-1862 | Print

Audrey Tyrka, M.D.
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior Possible Link Studied Between Childhood Abuse and Early Cellular Aging
Researchers from Brown University and Butler Hospital have determined that children who suffer physical or emotional abuse may be faced with accelerated cellular aging as adults. The findings are published online in the journal Biological Psychiatry. A print version of the articled is also expected.
PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] — Children who suffer physical or emotional abuse may be faced with accelerated cellular aging as adults, according to new research from Butler Hospital and Brown University.

The findings, which are published online in the journal Biological Psychiatry, draw a direct connection between childhood psychological trauma and accelerated reduction in the size of telomeres, the “caps” on the end of chromosomes that promote cellular stability. Telomeres typically shorten with age.

After measuring DNA extracted from blood samples of 31 adults, researchers found accelerated shortening of telomeres in those who reported suffering maltreatment as children, compared to study participants who did not.

“It tells us something. It gives us a hint that early developmental experiences may have profound effects on biology that can influence cellular mechanisms at a very basic level, said Dr. Audrey Tyrka, the study’s lead author. Tyrka is assistant professor of psychiatry and human behavior at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, and associate chief of the mood disorders program at Butler Hospital in Providence, R.I.

The work of Tyrka and the other authors builds on previous research that established psychological stress and trauma as risk factors for a number of medical and psychiatric illnesses. Other work has linked some of these psychiatric and medical problems with shortened telomere length. This study now establishes a link between early psychosocial stress and shorter telomere length.

Researchers have also found that telomeres shorten at a higher rate when exposed to toxins, such as radiation or cigarette smoke. Other studies have looked at adult female caregivers who are responsible for children with developmental delays, determining a link between accelerated telomere shortening and the higher stress levels the caregivers faced.

This may be the first attempt to look at telomere length in relation to childhood mistreatment.

Researchers said the early findings are compelling, because they looked at adults who were otherwise healthy and had not had any current or past psychiatric disorders. The early data shows strong links between childhood stress and the accelerated shortening of telomeres.

More work is needed, Tyrka said. “We don’t know what the full implications of this are yet. Shorter telomere lengths are linked to aging and certain diseases, so it is possible that this is a mechanism of risk for illness following childhood abuse,” she said. “But the precise role of telomeres in this process remains to be determined.”

Shorter telomere lengths have been linked to a variety of aging-related medical conditions including cardiovascular disease and cancer.

For this study, the scientists looked at 22 women and nine men between ages 18 and 64. Some of the subjects had no history of childhood maltreatment, but others said they had endured either moderate or severe mistreatment as children.

The adults who endured mistreatment as children varied in terms of the type of trauma they reported. They suffered individually from emotional abuse, emotional neglect, physical neglect, physical abuse and sexual abuse.

Grants from the National Institute of Mental Health and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders funded the study.

The paper’s other authors are Dr. Lawrence Price, professor of psychiatry and human behavior at Alpert Medical School and clinical director and director of research at Butler Hospital; Dr. Linda Carpenter, associate professor of psychiatry and human behavior at Alpert Medical School and chief of the mood disorders program at Butler Hospital; Barbara Porton, assistant professor of psychiatry and human behavior (research) at Alpert Medical School; Hung-Teh Kao, associate professor of psychiatry and human behavior (research) at Alpert Medical School; and Sarah Marsella, research assistant at Butler Hospital.


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#311393 - 11/22/09 12:27 PM Re: Abuse can lead to premature aging [Re: Ken Singer, LCSW]
DJsport Offline
Member
MaleSurvivor

Registered: 02/20/08
Posts: 1742
Good to know, Ken.

It gives some answers to a troubled mind and soul.

I know my heart started to give out sometime ago as I had a heart attack at age 42.

And we know heart attacks are inherited physically and emotionally and my family is one @#$%^& up bunch.

Peace,
DJ

_________________________
Live to your fullest potential

Never make someone a priority if your only an option

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#311409 - 11/22/09 03:22 PM Re: Abuse can lead to premature aging [Re: DJsport]
AndyJB2005 Offline
Member
MaleSurvivor

Registered: 11/14/06
Posts: 1242
Loc: Saint Paul, Minnesota
This would explain my male-pattern baldness and gray hair at only 28 years of age.

Hm...

_________________________
Life's disappointments are harder to take when you don't know any swear words. -- Calvin (Calvin and Hobbes)

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#311423 - 11/22/09 04:27 PM Re: Abuse can lead to premature aging [Re: AndyJB2005]
petercorbett Offline
Member
MaleSurvivor

Registered: 07/27/08
Posts: 2435
Loc: TEXAS
Hi, my fraternal brothers.

I had already a few grey hairs and a receding hairline in my late teens. Always looked older than i was even as a teen.

Nice to learn these things at 70 yrs old.

Heal well my fraternal brothers, heal well.

Little Pete & big Pete...but 1 (Irishmoose).

_________________________
Working Boys' Home 10-14 yrs old, grades 5-8. 1949-1953
____________________________________________________________
A very humble alumni of the WOR Dahlonega, GA.
May 15-17 2009, Alta, Sep. 2009. Sequoia, 2010.
Hope Springs, 2010.


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#311475 - 11/23/09 01:49 AM Re: Abuse can lead to premature aging [Re: petercorbett]
Logan Offline
Member
MaleSurvivor

Registered: 04/05/03
Posts: 1205
Loc: NY
This is very interesting!

Thank you Ken

Logan

_________________________
"Terrible thing to live in Fear"-Shawshank Redemption
WOR Alumnus Hope Springs 2009
"Quite a thing to live in fear, this is what is means to be a slave"
-Blade Runner

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#311478 - 11/23/09 02:54 AM Re: Abuse can lead to premature aging [Re: Logan]
LilacLouie Offline


Registered: 07/02/09
Posts: 359
Loc: Utah
I'm better than that Ken.

I'm gonna live foreever! Screw getting old!

Sad part is I'm likely to spend ALL of it in a retirement home not knowing who the hell I am! LOL!


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#312197 - 11/29/09 12:19 AM Re: Abuse can lead to premature aging [Re: LilacLouie]
king tut Offline
Member
MaleSurvivor

Registered: 02/13/08
Posts: 2466
Loc: UK
Oh great, that's not good news.

But i think i look younger than how old i am, so hopefully i am ok.

I also am going to live forever staying young! lol

Generally i think it is known that stress makes you age faster, whatever the cause of it.

_________________________
"...until lambs become lions"

I love you, little lewis, and i will never leave you. We are the same. You brighten my day, and i will make sure that i brighten yours. Hugs and kisses.


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#312470 - 11/30/09 11:58 PM Re: Abuse can lead to premature aging [Re: king tut]
ericc Offline
Member
MaleSurvivor

Registered: 01/04/08
Posts: 1961
Yeah, makes sense to me. I call it stress! Yeah, I try to compensate in other ways like trying to eat well and getting moderate exercise. Also trying to address the stress issues. More reason for me to stay away from the negatives like drinking and smoking (not a smoker regularly but when I drink; hmm, go figure). Well, thanks for sharing. I think most of us here could tell anyone who cared to listen that this stuff takes its toll.

Eric


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#312497 - 12/01/09 03:25 AM Re: Abuse can lead to premature aging [Re: ericc]
LilacLouie Offline


Registered: 07/02/09
Posts: 359
Loc: Utah
It's kind of an ironic funny for me. It's not "humorous" funny, but, well, I dunno.

The shit I keep putting up with, it's normal for me. When I talk to friends about it, they look at me like I'm weird. They say "and they KEEP doing that to you????" And I'm like "yeaaaaah.... So?" Because I have been putting up with it for over 20+ years.

What more can anyone do to me? Nothing that hasn't already been done to me, short of murder, of course (except that has been tried twice already, FWIW).


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