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#290246 - 06/04/09 01:11 PM Re: Eye problems (including reading) after abuse [Re: pufferfish]
ashgray2 Offline


Registered: 06/03/09
Posts: 3
If I feel my eyes are tired while I'm working, I always look for a pure green colored object to relax my eyes.
Since I'm always infront of a computerat any rate my eyes will be stress.
Sometimes I take some supplements that is good my eyes.

____________




Edited by ModTeam (06/04/09 01:48 PM)
Edit Reason: remove advert sig

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#291000 - 06/09/09 09:08 PM Re: Eye problems (including reading) after abuse [Re: pufferfish]
didi Offline


Registered: 07/12/08
Posts: 165
Loc: USA
It would make sense that EMDR would be an effective treatment for PTSD.

Knowing that PTSD has caused my sons Vision Issues, It certainly explains how Eye Movement could actualy HELP with it.

Not sure how it would work for children...

http://www.emdr.com/briefdes.htm


In 1989, Francine Shapiro (1995) noticed that the emotional distress accompanying disturbing thoughts disappeared as her eyes moved spontaneously and rapidly. She began experimenting with this effect and determined that when others moved their eyes, their distressing emotions also dissipated. She conducted a case study (1989b) and controlled study (1989a), and her hypothesis that eye movements (EMs) were related to desensitization of traumatic memories was supported. The role of eye movement had been previously documented in connection to cognitive processing mechanisms. A series of systematic experiments (Antrobus, 1973; Antrobus, Antrobus, & Singer, 1964) revealed that spontaneous EMs were associated with unpleasant emotions and cognitive changes.





Edited by didi (06/10/09 06:45 AM)
Edit Reason: more info
_________________________
Raising children who have been loaned to us for a brief moment outranks every other responsibility!

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#291450 - 06/13/09 06:02 PM Re: Eye problems (including reading) after abuse [Re: didi]
pufferfish Offline
Member
MaleSurvivor

Registered: 02/26/08
Posts: 6805
Loc: USA
Didi and everybody,

As I stated, EMDR was tremendously beneficial for me.

The sessions brought me emotionally right into the extremely painful abuse I had experienced. It was like a flashback X 100. But I don't say this to discourage anybody. The EMDR sessions brought lasting relief from those haunting memories in the back of my mind and the flashbacks and troublesome emotions they produced.

But the relief was permanent. Flashbacks come and come and come and come. EMDR was painful but it was a permanent fix. It stopped the flashbacks plus the elusive ghost-like emotions that crop up unexpectedly. I still needed talk therapy because I had to orient my thinking afterwards.

I might "watch-it" for little children. I don't know what their reaction might be. At least they should be watched very carefully during EMDR.

Allen

pufferfish whistle


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#291534 - 06/14/09 07:28 AM Re: Eye problems (including reading) after abuse [Re: pufferfish]
didi Offline


Registered: 07/12/08
Posts: 165
Loc: USA
Hello Allen!

I might "watch-it" for little children. I don't know what their reaction might be. At least they should be watched very carefully during EMDR.

I had asked a therapist about this, and I do believe that you are right. Young children take thier time disclosing everything that happened to them. They could only handle "small doses" or they would certainly go over the edge.
EMDR may be a possibility in my son's teens.

Take care,

Didi

_________________________
Raising children who have been loaned to us for a brief moment outranks every other responsibility!

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#293250 - 06/26/09 08:21 PM Re: Eye problems (including reading) after abuse [Re: pufferfish]
pufferfish Offline
Member
MaleSurvivor

Registered: 02/26/08
Posts: 6805
Loc: USA
Originally Posted By: pufferfish

I had independently come to the conclusion that abuse was the major contributing factor to the problem with my eyes: I was wall-eyed (medically called exotropia, a kind of strabismus).

I had trouble learning to read as a small boy. Then when I did learn to read, I was a painfully slow reader.


Here is a picture of exotropia in a boy. Notice the left eye.

This picture is not me(Allen = pufferfish). I have been told that I looked a lot like the boy in the picture. For me the right eye was the wandering eye.



It can be surgically corrected so that it looks normal. But it requires vision therapy to help both eyes work together and read together.

Allen

pufferfish whistle





Edited by pufferfish (06/26/09 08:40 PM)
Edit Reason: identity of picture

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#364075 - 06/13/11 01:01 AM Re: Eye problems (including reading) after abuse [Re: pufferfish]
pufferfish Offline
Member
MaleSurvivor

Registered: 02/26/08
Posts: 6805
Loc: USA
I hope this is not crass. I don't intend anything negative by this post. I just want to reinforce this idea about eye problems as being related to abuse and the nervous system problems which stem from abuse.

This came up in the news yesterday. Look at the difference in the left eye before and after. I'm only making one point here: Brain damage can affect the eye control.






Certainly there's no argument about brain damage here.

If this offends anyone I'll be glad to take it down.

Allen


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#409455 - 09/07/12 11:55 PM Re: Eye problems (including reading) after abuse [Re: pufferfish]
pufferfish Offline
Member
MaleSurvivor

Registered: 02/26/08
Posts: 6805
Loc: USA
There are some books out now which seem to strengthen this whole premise:

Fixing My Gaze, by Susan Barry and Oliver Sacks.

http://www.amazon.com/Fixing-My-Gaze-Scientists-Dimensions/dp/0465020739/

I don't think you have to buy this book to help you. There are other things which will help more. I'll add them as they come to mind.

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#410272 - 09/16/12 07:52 AM Re: Eye problems (including reading) after abuse [Re: pufferfish]
Farmer Boy Offline
Member
MaleSurvivor

Registered: 08/23/12
Posts: 442
Loc: Australia
Wow

I have to say this has opened a new can of worms of me too. I was first abused about 4-6 (I don't really know yet). I have had dyslexia type symptoms as long as I can remember. I also have bad depth perception, peripheral vision and fine motor skills. I sucked at sport obviously. My eyes are not visibly turned though. Reading has always been hard work. I bluffed my way through high school with B's in english and only ever read 1 whole book.

In my case it may be genetic though. My mum has a turned eye and my brother (who was also abused), nephews and my daughter (who I don't think have been abused) all have dyslexia type problems.

It does make you think.....
_________________________
More than meets the eye!

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#410325 - 09/16/12 08:04 PM Re: Eye problems (including reading) after abuse [Re: Farmer Boy]
pufferfish Offline
Member
MaleSurvivor

Registered: 02/26/08
Posts: 6805
Loc: USA
My father had the same problem I have, but to a much smaller extent. My father's father (my grandfather) had it worse still. It is part of my conclusion that abuse has been handed down in that side of the family from father to son. The eye problem appears after abuse. Not all people with the problem were abused, and not all abused people develop the problem. My grandfather was orphaned at age 8 and he was sent to live with a family where he was apparently abused. The problem is more prevalent in boys than girls.

In my recent post on body memories I have pictures which document the development of my eye problem after abuse.

http://www.malesurvivor.org/board/ubbthr...9532#Post409532

Farmer Boy, I also went through high school without reading all the books and assignments. I think that some boys in that situation simply drop out of school at that point. This means that abuse often contributes to drop out rate.

Puffer



Edited by pufferfish (09/16/12 08:11 PM)

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#410349 - 09/17/12 03:29 AM Re: Eye problems (including reading) after abuse [Re: pufferfish]
traveler Offline
Member
MaleSurvivor

Registered: 02/07/06
Posts: 3295
Loc: back in the USA
my eyes started going bad about the same time the abuse at home was getting worse. my vision deteriorated more rapidly when the bullying and abuse started at school. for a while i needed new glasses every 3-4 months. i thought i was going blind. it never occurred to me that the two might be related. at 13, when we moved and all the abuse stopped - except for the verbal & emotional stuff, my vision decline leveled out or slowed way down. i don't know if there is anything to this - but it sure is an interesting coincidence. another thing - i was the only one in my family that needed glasses as a child - and now that we are all more mature - my vision is still the worst (mom and 2 brothers wear glasses for reading) - and i was the only one abused.

Lee
_________________________
We are often troubled, but not crushed;
sometimes in doubt, but never in despair;
there are many enemies, but we are never without a friend;
and though badly hurt at times, we are not destroyed.
- Paul, II Cor 4:8-9

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