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#247386 - 08/30/08 07:15 AM ptsd
Nate Offline
Guest

Registered: 04/30/07
Posts: 94
Loc: Philadelphia, PA
so i was doing some research and was reading more about ptsd (post-traumatic stress disorder) and well... I think that's what I'm experiencing... maybe more so since my anniversary - i'm not sleeping well still. anyway - i have a lot of the symptoms and was curious if this is normal. hav eyou guys ever been diagnosed w/ ptsd either by yourself or a T?

thanks

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"Love the moment. Flowers grow out of dark moments. Therefore, each moment is vital. It affects the whole. Life is a succession of such moments and to live each, is to succeed."

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#247388 - 08/30/08 07:37 AM Re: ptsd [Re: Nate]
hogan_dawg Offline
Guest

Registered: 03/26/08
Posts: 492
Yes.

It's hard to imagine a case of sexual assault that isn't traumatizing - probably huge numbers of people with CSA are traumatized. I guess the question is, then, who has actually had the diagnosis?



Edited by hogan_dawg (08/30/08 07:38 AM)
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I can say unequivocally that the lie of "To truly heal you must first forgive" has derailed more victims than the abusers themselves.
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#247389 - 08/30/08 07:39 AM Re: ptsd [Re: hogan_dawg]
Nate Offline
Guest

Registered: 04/30/07
Posts: 94
Loc: Philadelphia, PA
and how do u deal w/ it or recover?

_________________________
"Love the moment. Flowers grow out of dark moments. Therefore, each moment is vital. It affects the whole. Life is a succession of such moments and to live each, is to succeed."

- Corita Kent

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#247398 - 08/30/08 09:33 AM Re: ptsd [Re: Nate]
kutcher Offline
Member
MaleSurvivor

Registered: 08/16/08
Posts: 99
Loc: Delaware
Nate,

I am new here but I will tell you my therapist has said she believes I suffer from it as well. We have used EMDR, a light based device, that has shown to help. Check it our on line.

I find it hard to describe but it has definately started to make a change for me. I have only had one session but it is a tool she and I will continue to use as I move through recovery.

PM if you want to discuss further. I would be happy to get into more detail with you if you like.

Dave


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#247399 - 08/30/08 09:48 AM Re: ptsd [Re: kutcher]
hogan_dawg Offline
Guest

Registered: 03/26/08
Posts: 492
I don't believe people completely recover from PTSD. Personally, I would abandon that dream, cause I think you'll be disappointed, but aim for the best treatment you can get and learn to manage it in your life instead.

Think of trauma this way: I or any man can traumatize a small animal permanently and irrevocably in about 30 seconds flat. Now imagine that the trama a human goes through happens multiple times, or is prolonged over time, over years. It is not science fiction to imagine such repeated or prolonged trauma incidents having an 'additive effect' and resulting in relatively permanent changes to human functioning. Just think about it. Can I still find symptoms of PTSD in a concentration camp victim? Sure, it's easy to conceive. Or a war veteran shell shocked? Sure, it's easy to imagine. Now imagine a sexual assault victim, penetrated or violated in the most humiliating of human ways, and it's easy to see how trauma might be relatively permanent.

A lot of eager and well meaning counselors, psychologists and other health care professionals will tell you that they can 'cure' PTSD symptoms. Further, many clients will probably be out there who will tell you they're 'cured'.

When you consider the sheer 'force' of trauma and it's impact on the human body and mind, it's hard to believe these well meaning folk. I think it's pretty easy to take any person who has been traumatized and find ways in which they're still affected by the trauma - be it triggering, or 'shell shock' nervous reactions, enhanced vigilence, depression, sexual dysfunction and numerous other symptoms.

The jury is still out on treatment, with many treatment methods vying for attention. Beware gimmicks. Beware also clinical reports of effectiveness without appropriate experimental controls and controls on subject selection. Remember, it's easy to get clients to say "It helped me" but it's quite another thing to get more of these clients to say "It helped me" than the number of subjects using some other more established clinical treatment (e.g., like anti anxiety drugs, antidepressants plus therapy treatment combined). People invest time in a therapist they trust: So a bias can develop which favors the current therapy.

Another thing to ask about a treatment is: Why 'should' it work?

I haven't really found a satisfactory explanation of why certain treatments 'should' work. Like, EMDR, I don't get it. I haven't yet seen a good scientific explanation of why it should work - so I haven't opted to try it. To me, until I understand how it works, it's like putting banana butter on my balls - if it doesn't make sense to me then why try it?

I think it makes sense that if you understand trauma, what it does to the body (i.e., putting the body on high alert, preparing it for danger, increasing adrenaline production, changing how your neurotransmitters are functioning) then you might have a leg up on getting treatment for it or structuring your treatment to suit your particular PTSD. It's abrupt, extreme anxiety, and it's a depressing kind of learned helplessness.

So it'll probably also make sense that if you can learn relaxation techniques that alleviate anxiety, you're probably on the right track. If you can get help with any affect dysfunction like depression or manic depression, you're also heading down the right road. The appropriate medications for anxt and affect problems are well documented.




Edited by hogan_dawg (08/30/08 10:05 AM)
_________________________
I can say unequivocally that the lie of "To truly heal you must first forgive" has derailed more victims than the abusers themselves.
Andrew Vachs, 2003

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#247405 - 08/30/08 10:13 AM Re: ptsd [Re: hogan_dawg]
EGL Offline
Moderator Emeritus
MaleSurvivor
Registered: 06/19/04
Posts: 7821
Hi Nate,

I was diagnosed by my T as having PTSD, and I think Hogan said it really well above when he said that he didn't think anyone ever really fully recovers from it. I agree with that, and I think that what we can hope for is to live a better life in recognition of what happened to us and it's effects, and then move forward from there. I think Hollywood is partly to blame for the idea that people can somehow have a spontaneous healing experience, such as in the movie "Good Will Hunting". While I liked the movie, I just really don't think it was very realistic in that regard.

I think the main thing is to work on it piece by piece, take it apart and see how each component relates to the past and how you can now understand it. That's how it's been for me anyway, kind of like tearing down a wall one stone at a time.

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#247444 - 08/30/08 01:45 PM Re: ptsd [Re: EGL]
michael banks Offline


Registered: 06/12/08
Posts: 1755
Loc: Mojave Desert, Ca
Nate,

Yesterday, I was diagnosed as having PTSD by my psychiatrist.
At least now I know what I dealing with.
Before I just thought I was f--king whacked.
I hope Eddie and Dawg are wrong but have a feeling that they maybe right.
My psyche put me back on prozac, it really helps me with the symptoms-depression,hyper vigilence etc.
I am also starting in a men's CSA group in a couple of weeks.
I hope this will help in learning how to cope with this thing.

mike

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"IT ought never be forgotten that the past is the parent of the future" John C. Calhoun

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#247504 - 08/30/08 07:20 PM Re: ptsd [Re: michael banks]
OKIE MIKE Offline
Member

Registered: 02/13/04
Posts: 982
Loc: HULBERT OK
Nate , I have ben diagnoised with PTSD . I wish that there was an easy way to deal with it . I have tried to do the best that i can . I have tried several difrent meds with various results. some of them work fo a while . and some of them not at all.
It is a hard thing to live with. You Just take life as it comes. what ealse can You do

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"I HAD NO SHOES THEN I SAW A MAN THAT HAD NO FEET"

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#247541 - 08/31/08 12:27 AM Re: ptsd [Re: OKIE MIKE]
blueshift Offline
Guest

Registered: 01/21/08
Posts: 1242
Loc: infinity
I have to deal with PTSD also and probably most on this site do to some extent. I wish I had advice or something helpful, but I guess I'm just dealing with mine by just getting used to it.

That's not very encouraging I guess but just know you have plenty of company here in the PTSD dept.


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