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#235348 - 07/02/08 09:24 PM My New Hobby
BJK Offline
Member
MaleSurvivor

Registered: 08/02/07
Posts: 1526
In trying to recapture my childhood, it seems as if I have outgrown Transformers. I need something a little more satisfying, so I decided to try my hand at another of my hobbies I had as a kid: Plastic model building.

This is my first attempt in almost 20 years. It is a 1965 Ford Mustand 2+2 Fastback. The body paint as well as some of the detailing is a little shoddy, but I'm still learning. However, I do have to say that this absolutely blows away any attempts I made back as a child.

The front view depicts two of my favorite aspects of the Mustang body style. The slightly recessed black grille accented by the Mustang emblem gives most Mustangs their true personality.

The side view shows a couple of other characteristics of the Mustang that I have always liked. The red, white, and blue Mustang emblem along with the metallic emblem that declares what is under the hood, in this case a 286. The metal alloy wheels were stock in 1965 with a middle hub accent that matched the body color.

The interior was a cushy white leather along with the Mustang wood-grain steering wheel. The radio was an AM jobbie, and the Mustang emblem accented the right bottom part of the glove compartment. The interior especially brings back memories of my own 1975 Mustang I drove as a teenager. There wasn't nearly as much chrome, but the shape of the instrument panel as well as the shifter and the glove compartment were identical.

The tail lights were completely separate from the backup lights, and the dual exhaust pipes added symmetry.

Alas, the engine is what makes any car, and the Ford 286 that the 2+2 Fastback came with stock meant business. Ford also made a Mustang 350 in 1965 that came stock with the powerful Ford 351, which was meant to compete with Chevrolet's famous Corvette.


Next up is a 1934 Ford Coupe.

_________________________
Revenge is nothing more than another way of perpetuating abuse.

What the world needs now
Is some new words of wisdom
Like la la la la la la la la la.
-David Lowery

Having a friend who will keep a secret for you is worthless compared to a friend who won't keep a secret from you.

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#235351 - 07/02/08 09:47 PM Re: My New Hobby [Re: BJK]
Trucker51 Offline
Member
MaleSurvivor

Registered: 05/20/08
Posts: 2826
Loc: Denver, CO
Any pointers? I haven't put a model together in 35 years or more. Last year I bought a nearly 3 foot long powered RC model of a World War II US Fletcher-class Destroyer. Now all that I have to do is learn how to put it together, again. Got to go get the tools, the glue, the paint and the brushes yet. It has lots of moving parts though, and looks like it could take a lot of time to build. It is a 1/125th scale.

Nice car. A buddy in high school had a '65 Mustang convertible, and I had a '70 Mustang Mach 1 with a 351 Cleveland V-8 back in 1974/75 at about the same time. It was lucky that gas was only 50 cents a gallon back then.

Mark

_________________________
"We stay here, we die here. We've got to keep moving". Trucker Mark



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#235362 - 07/02/08 10:10 PM Re: My New Hobby [Re: Trucker51]
BJK Offline
Member
MaleSurvivor

Registered: 08/02/07
Posts: 1526
I actually just obtained a lot of 8 model kits on ebay for a total price of about $5 each, which is about how much they cost when I was a kid. I'm certainly hoping that they last me a few months:)

As far as pointers, patience is a virtue. I rarely spent more than 20-30 minutes on this model at any one time. I started by getting a certain part, like the engine/tranny assembly, ready to assemble. Then, the next day, I'd put that together and get the next part, like the chassis assembly, ready to assemble. Many parts, like the body and the interior, took several days. But I have found that a large part of the fun of assembling a model is admiring it while it's being built. This Mustang took me about three weeks to build, and I'd classify it as an "easy" model.

Seriously, though, the pointers I have are all things that I kind of took for granted as a kid. For instance, actually listen to the model instructions when they tell you certain things. For instance, always read the instructions before starting if only to get a good plan together for how you are going to paint it. It helps out a lot to be able to, for instance, paint all of the rust colored parts at the same time. Always allow the paint and glue to dry thoroughly. That was a mistake I made with this Mustang. I got too hasty, and I ended up with fingerprints that couldn't be completely sanded away. Allow 48 hours for gloss body paint to dry. Since you're building a ship, you'll probably not be working with gloss paints, but you'll still want to allow at least 24 hours for the flat paints to dry. There are five coats of white paint on that Mustang body.

Another mistake I made on this Mustang was not realizing that a lot of the body details were actuall decals, so I could have avoided a lot of painstaking effort by just reading through the instructions.

Also, I've made pretty liberal use of toothpicks and needles for the detail work. I use both kinds of toothpicks...the ones with two points as well as the flat edged ones. I use them to paint and to glue. I also use TONS of paint thinner, and I have quite a few backup brushes.

As far as tools go, I find the following absolutely necessary:

toothpicks (both kinds)
hobby knife (always cut the pieces from the sprew...never twist)
tweezers (otherwise, I get glue-fingerprints all over the place)
good hand soap (I'm washing my hands constantly)
a good surface mat (always protect your work surface)
a cutting block (ditto)
a spare empty paint jar (for cleaning brushes)
plenty of room (have to let stuff dry)

When I was a kid, I put together a few planes and ships, but I honestly don't know much about them. That's why I chose cars. I've always been intrigued by cars, not so much by the mechanical workings of them, but by the body styles.

Let me know how it goes.

Bryan

_________________________
Revenge is nothing more than another way of perpetuating abuse.

What the world needs now
Is some new words of wisdom
Like la la la la la la la la la.
-David Lowery

Having a friend who will keep a secret for you is worthless compared to a friend who won't keep a secret from you.

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#235374 - 07/02/08 10:41 PM Re: My New Hobby [Re: BJK]
Trucker51 Offline
Member
MaleSurvivor

Registered: 05/20/08
Posts: 2826
Loc: Denver, CO
I got this one for a really good price too. It is a Lindbergh "Blue Devil" skill-level three (of three). Level-one is the easiest. Up until now I have just been displaying it in the box. I once gave my dad a really complex model of some 1920s biplane, which he started but never finished. When I was a little kid, he had just finished building a large model of a Piper Tri-Pacer, a plane that he used to own, when I got the brilliant idea to fly it down the basement stairs. And another time he built an RC model airplane. On its first flight, the motor died at couple hundred feet and it made a kamikaze dive into the parking lot. I still have the motor of that plane sitting here on display in its original box. It still has the bent throttle linkage from its one disatrous flight.

We used to live on the shore of a small lake when I was a kid. I built several ship models including a 1/350th model of the Aircraft Carrier ORISKANY. Unfortunately, back in my juvenile firestarting days the model was destroyed by a huge explosion when the trailing gasoline slick ignited the stored fuel within. Now many years later I would like to replace that model with a little more serious one.

How will I find the time? It could take a year to build it.

Thanks for your thoughts.

Mark

_________________________
"We stay here, we die here. We've got to keep moving". Trucker Mark



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#235381 - 07/02/08 11:12 PM Re: My New Hobby [Re: Trucker51]
Nyjah Offline
Member
MaleSurvivor

Registered: 07/14/07
Posts: 610
Hah. I thought this was a real car.

Really cool model though, I've never put any together.


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#235387 - 07/02/08 11:45 PM Re: My New Hobby [Re: Nyjah]
dgoods Offline
Guest

Registered: 10/15/07
Posts: 622
Loc: Richmond area
Funny how i'm perfectly willing to spend hours agonizing over the mastering of some new remix, but have no patience for model-building (unless it's of the "Snap-Tite" variety). I remember a B-25 Mitchell, and a Peterbuilt model, but that's as far as i got with it... The 'stang looks good though ;\)

_________________________
Give sorrow words: the grief that does not speak
Whispers the o'er-fraught heart and bids it break.

-William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act IV, Sc. III

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#235392 - 07/03/08 12:28 AM Re: My New Hobby [Re: dgoods]
theatrekid Offline
Member
MaleSurvivor

Registered: 06/03/07
Posts: 702
Loc: oregon
whoa whoa whoa, you have outgrown transformers? I wont believe it I won't have it! Transformers are a timeless gift to all man kind. \:\)

Models are fun to though. One of my favorite childhood memories are of my dad and I putting together a Crysler Prowler. We sanded and painted and glued all the little peices together I think I still have it floating some were around my room.

Good Luck on the Models!


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#235394 - 07/03/08 12:47 AM Re: My New Hobby [Re: theatrekid]
Trucker51 Offline
Member
MaleSurvivor

Registered: 05/20/08
Posts: 2826
Loc: Denver, CO
My youngest nephew is 15 & 1/2 and is still big into Transformers. I think that he has them all and then some, along with plenty of Lego sets. My sister is a Lego distributor.

Mark

_________________________
"We stay here, we die here. We've got to keep moving". Trucker Mark



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#235943 - 07/05/08 07:53 AM Re: My New Hobby [Re: Trucker51]
CDavid Offline


Registered: 07/05/08
Posts: 184
Brian,


No one really gives up on Transformers...do they? :-)

The model is cool...I thought it was real, too!

When I was eighteen, we found a (yes, it is true) farmer that had a 65 mustang, literally, behind his barn. His daughter wrecked it, he stashed it there. He sold it for five hundred dollars. It needed some sheet metal work on the front, but was in really good shape otherwise. It had the ponies laminated in the seats.

Of course, that was many, many years ago. Uhm, many years ago.

I envy your patience with the models, though...sigh...


:-)


CD


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#236092 - 07/05/08 04:08 PM Re: My New Hobby [Re: CDavid]
Trucker51 Offline
Member
MaleSurvivor

Registered: 05/20/08
Posts: 2826
Loc: Denver, CO
15 years ago when hauling high-tension power poles in northeast rural Colorado, I came across a farm where this guy had an old Studebaker Golden Hawk in his barn that looked like it was in pretty good shape. I offered him $2,000 for the car, but he said that someday he planned to restore it. The guy was about 80 years old then, back in the summer of 1993. I wonder if he ever finished it or is still interested in selling it?

Mark

_________________________
"We stay here, we die here. We've got to keep moving". Trucker Mark



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