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#191308 - 11/13/07 06:07 PM PTSD "Post Tramatic Stress Disorder" Info.
Amanda_D Offline
Member
MaleSurvivor

Registered: 10/30/07
Posts: 62
Loc: Great Lakes State Michigan is ...
Post-traumatic Stress—What Is It?
YEARS AGO, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was usually called shell shock or combat fatigue and was studied primarily in connection with military veterans.* Today much has changed. You don't have to be a soldier to be diagnosed with PTSD. You only have to be a survivor of some traumatic event.

The event could be anything from a war to a rape attempt to a car accident. A fact sheet from the National Center for PTSD, in the United States, puts it this way: "To be diagnosed with PTSD, an individual must have been exposed to a traumatic event." And this event "must involve some type of actual or threatened PHYSICAL injury or assault."

Jane, mentioned in the preceding article, relates: "I have learned that sudden terror causes certain hormones to surge, and these hormones cause the senses to become hyperalert to danger. Ordinarily hormone levels fall back down to normal after the danger has passed, but in the case of PTSD sufferers, they remain elevated." The event was in the past, but the terror of those moments seemed to be trying to take up permanent residence in Jane's mind, like an unwelcome tenant who ignores an eviction notice.

If you have survived a trauma and are experiencing similar aftereffects, it is important to realize that you are not alone. In a book she wrote on rape, author Linda E. Ledray explains that PTSD "is a normal reaction seen in normal people who have been through a terrifying situation in which they could not control what was happening."

Yet, calling PTSD normal doesn't mean that every survivor of a trauma will develop it. Ledray notes: "A 1992 study found that, one week after a rape, 94 percent of the survivors evaluated met the criteria for PTSD and at twelve weeks 47 percent continued to do so. Fifty percent of the women seen at the Sexual Assault Resource Service in Minneapolis in 1993 met the criteria for PTSD one year after rape."

Such statistics reveal that PTSD is common, far more common than most people realize. And all sorts of people are sufferers, following many types of incidents. Authors Alexander C. McFarlane and Lars Weisaeth observe: "Recent studies have shown that traumatic events frequently happen to civilians during peacetime, as well as to soldiers and war victims, and that many survivors of such frequent events develop PTSD." Even medical procedures or heart attacks have triggered PTSD in some individuals.

"PTSD has turned out to be a very common disorder," explain the above-quoted authors. They further say: "A random survey of 1,245 American adolescents showed that 23% had been the victims of physical or sexual assaults, as well as witnesses of violence against others. One out of five of the exposed adolescents developed PTSD. This suggests that approximately 1.07 million U.S. teenagers currently suffer from PTSD."

If the statistic is accurate, that means there are a lot of teenage sufferers in just one country! What can be done for such persons, as well as for the many millions of other sufferers worldwide?

What Can Be Done?If you believe that you or someone you know may suffer from PTSD, the following are some suggestions.

Don't hold back from encouraging the sufferer/or yourself. If you or a loved one dealing with the horrible memory of some traumatic event, understand that he or she is not overreacting or deliberately being difficult. Because of emotional numbness, anxiety, or anger, he or she may not be able to respond as you would wish to the efforts you are making to be supportive. But don't give up!

The sufferer needs to recognize and avoid unwise coping strategies that cause further harm. These include use of illicit drugs and overindulgence in alcoholic beverages. Although alcohol and drugs may give promise of temporary relief, they soon make matters worse. They usually contribute to social isolation, rejection of the people who want to help, workaholism, uncontrolled anger, uncontrolled or overcontrolled eating, or other self-destructive behavior.

Consult with a competent health professional. It may turn out that the sufferer doesn't have PTSD, but if he or she does, effective therapies exist.# If you are receiving professional help, be honest with that person and ask for help to overcome any of the above behaviors.

Remember: Physical wounds are often the first to heal, but people suffering from PTSD can be wounded in many ways in body, mind, and spirit. The next article will discuss further ways that the sufferer and those around him can take part in the healing process and will also discuss the hope for all sufferers of post-traumatic shock.

_________________________
"Just Breath" Your here and that makes all the difference!.....(wife of a surviver, trying to survive as well!) Here to get some answers and support...Here to do what I can to be a hearing ear.....Thankyou to all of you, ahead of time!

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#191309 - 11/13/07 06:12 PM Re: PTSD "Post Tramatic Stress Disorder" Info. [Re: Amanda_D]
Amanda_D Offline
Member
MaleSurvivor

Registered: 10/30/07
Posts: 62
Loc: Great Lakes State Michigan is ...
Symptoms of Post-traumatic Stress

Many trauma survivors find themselves reexperiencing the trauma in their mind. Survivors usually can't control this or stop it from occurring. The consequences may include:


Flashbacks—feelings that the trauma is happening again

Bad dreams and nightmares

A tendency to be very startled by loud noises or by someone unexpectedly coming up to them from behind

A shaky feeling and sweatiness

A pounding heart or trouble breathing

A feeling of upset when reminded of the trauma by something seen, heard, felt, smelled, or tasted

Anxiety or fear—the feeling of being in danger again

Trouble controlling emotions because reminders lead to sudden anxiety, anger, or upset

Difficulty concentrating or thinking clearly

Difficulty falling or staying asleep

Agitation and a constant state of being on the lookout for danger

An emotional shutdown or emotional numbness

Trouble having loving feelings or feeling any strong emotions

The feeling that surroundings are strange or unreal

Loss of interest in things that were previously enjoyable

Trouble remembering important parts of what happened during the trauma

A feeling of being disconnected from the world around them and the things happening to them

_________________________
"Just Breath" Your here and that makes all the difference!.....(wife of a surviver, trying to survive as well!) Here to get some answers and support...Here to do what I can to be a hearing ear.....Thankyou to all of you, ahead of time!

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#191478 - 11/15/07 08:29 AM Re: PTSD "Post Tramatic Stress Disorder" Info. [Re: Amanda_D]
cbfull Offline
Member
MaleSurvivor

Registered: 01/26/07
Posts: 386
Loc: Ohio
Great idea posting this. I have recently been trying to understand the symptoms of PTSD and just how much they might apply to me personally. I have struggled with depression, anxiety and panic attacks on and off for many years, I am in the middle of trying to determine just how much of it has been caused by flashbacks, and it's slowly appearing that most if it fits the bill. I recently had a flashback and subsequently my very first realization that I was having one, so I want to explore the possibility that they might have been the cause of my attacks in the past. It's that first symptom in the list that drops my jaw.

"Flashbacks—feelings that the trauma is happening again"

Keep posting!
Craig

_________________________
Craig

Guilt and shame have never done any of us any good at all.

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#191773 - 11/18/07 08:19 AM Re: PTSD "Post Tramatic Stress Disorder" Info. [Re: cbfull]
Power_water Offline
Guest

Registered: 09/14/07
Posts: 45
Loc: Portland, OR, USA
I don't like PTSD, I was first diagnosed with it about five years ago, only he said I had 'severe complex PTSD' he also said I was a risk to myself.

Until he had diagnosed me with it , I had never heard of it. But over the years I can see clearly that every thing he said was right. Two years later, another T a psychologist who was a very good listener, suggested I might need to try some mental meds to help. He was right, but they only help so much, the real healing has to come from somewhere else, and the side effects yuck. I hope and pray the MDSD (ecstasy) becomes available by pre>
_________________________
Bring works of darkness to light

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#191925 - 11/19/07 07:57 PM Re: PTSD "Post Tramatic Stress Disorder" Info. [Re: Power_water]
cbfull Offline
Member
MaleSurvivor

Registered: 01/26/07
Posts: 386
Loc: Ohio
What is MDSD? Ecstacy is MDMA. I've never heard of MDMA being prescribed as a treatment for anything other than making you want to dance until the sun comes up. I know it used to have therapeutic potential back when it was first synthesized by A. Shulgin, but I didn't know there was any real potential for this substance to be used to successfully treat psychological disorders.

Very interesting. I would like to know more if you can provide.

Craig

_________________________
Craig

Guilt and shame have never done any of us any good at all.

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#193163 - 11/29/07 02:11 PM Re: PTSD "Post Tramatic Stress Disorder" Info. [Re: cbfull]
alexey Offline
Moderator Emeritus
MaleSurvivor
Registered: 08/16/05
Posts: 1674
Loc: Moscow, Russia
Thanks for this great info, Amanda. It will surey help many guys to get informed about PTSD. Of course, so many of us have this disorder, including me.

Thank you.

Alexey

_________________________
(\__/)
(='.'=)
E[:]|||||[:]3
(")_(")
--------
When you feel all alone and unhappy, turn to you Inner Child and talk to Him.
You will see He can comfort you like nothing else!

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#193174 - 11/29/07 02:54 PM Re: PTSD "Post Tramatic Stress Disorder" Info. [Re: alexey]
J.R. Offline
Member
MaleSurvivor

Registered: 11/13/07
Posts: 307
Loc: United States
Thanks for posting Amanda. It hits home all to well what PTSD is. I was diagnosed with "C-PTSD" a little while back, that's called Complex Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. I am trying to deal with it, but it's hard when those around you don't understand. Does anybody have any advice?

Joseph


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#193177 - 11/29/07 03:42 PM Re: PTSD "Post Tramatic Stress Disorder" Info. [Re: J.R.]
KENKEN Offline
Member
MaleSurvivor

Registered: 09/25/07
Posts: 762
Loc: NOTHERN COLORADO
Hi Amanda:
I just finished a 3 week class for trauma/therapy through my insurance company. It's main goal was to equip us with helpful ways to combat/control bouts with nightmares/flashbacks. I wish I could somehow relay all the handouts and info. I received. The class was very good for me and I found ways to deal with these issues when they happen to me. I still get the sweats and pounding heart, but I can control the emotional side. And yea, Joseph P., the people around me, my GF, just don't understand. I hear ya, but I try to not get to emotional around her is I can. I am learning to shelf my emotions until I am alone. Sometime it works and then sometimes I just can't.

This sure is a great topic.

Until then

Ken

_________________________
I AM A GOOD PERSON, I AM A GOOD MAN

From the Movie: Antwone Fisher

***WOR ALUMNI SEQUOIA MARCH 2008***

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#338535 - 08/18/10 02:27 AM Re: PTSD "Post Tramatic Stress Disorder" Info. [Re: KENKEN]
Remixen Offline


Registered: 08/18/10
Posts: 1
People with PTSD have persistent frightening thoughts and memories of their ordeal and feel emotionally numb, especially with people they were once close to. They may experience sleep problems, feel detached or numb, or be easily startled.

_________________________
mcdba-mcdst-mcitp-mcp

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#338537 - 08/18/10 07:38 AM Re: PTSD "Post Tramatic Stress Disorder" Info. [Re: Remixen]
Mountainous Buck Offline
Member
MaleSurvivor

Registered: 12/15/09
Posts: 1626
Loc: Minnesota
Wow
I wish I knew this years ago!

_________________________
We have to take responsibility for what we're not responsible for.

“It doesn't matter where you've come from,
It matters where you go" Frank Turner

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#338656 - 08/19/10 04:13 PM Re: PTSD "Post Tramatic Stress Disorder" Info. [Re: Mountainous Buck]
ejccec Offline


Registered: 08/18/10
Posts: 5
Loc: VA
I was at a spiritual/alternative healing shop the other day and picked up a book about trauma symptoms to read while my husband was getting a psychic reading. I read for about an hour- I couldn't put it down! I have a background in psych and also worked as a rape crisis councilor on a hotline for a few years (which obviously required training)- but this stuff was all new to me. The book approached it from another angle. It was called "Waking the tiger: Healing trauma: The Innate Capacity to Transform Overwhelming Experiences". It was about the animal world- how animals are frequently attacked but still they show no signs of trauma. And then it looked at the human brain and experience and explained why we DO show signs of PTSD after being attacked (or any other range of difficult events). The book is not specifically about sexual trauma or abuse (in fact, it references a wide range of possible experiences that induce these kinds of reactions in people)- but if you are interested in psychology, spirituality, or just maybe understanding the science of why we react this way- you may want to check it out. I am in no way insinuating that extensive therapy, drugs, etc may not be necessary in many cases to even step into the pain that some people with ptsd are feeling. However, if you are the kind of person who is curious about all the different perspectives on trauma, who feels close with nature or finds healing there, or who just likes to try to help yourself (while simultaneously getting help from professionals)- check it out for sure. I, for one, found a lot of healing in just *understanding* my overwhelming reactions.


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#338657 - 08/19/10 04:19 PM Re: PTSD "Post Tramatic Stress Disorder" Info. [Re: ejccec]
Mountainous Buck Offline
Member
MaleSurvivor

Registered: 12/15/09
Posts: 1626
Loc: Minnesota
Gotcha-I requested it from the library.

After escaping a near-death experience, an animal will shake itself rigorously in an effort to distance itself from the episode.

I don't think humans have that, certainly not children or adolescents, and especially those from dysfunctional homes where the language of healing, boundaries, and help and safety are not practiced.

Thanks for the tip.

_________________________
We have to take responsibility for what we're not responsible for.

“It doesn't matter where you've come from,
It matters where you go" Frank Turner

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#338799 - 08/22/10 03:09 PM Re: PTSD "Post Tramatic Stress Disorder" Info. [Re: Mountainous Buck]
kidneythis Offline


Registered: 11/08/09
Posts: 1558
"animals are frequently attacked but still they show no signs of trauma"

That line alone should make you run as fast as possible away from this book and idea.
What would an outward sign of the "trauma" of being attacked be in an animal?
As for not showing any signs of the "trauma". Conceding for the point that this concept might be valid not showing signs isn't proof of anything as the concept assumes. I was made to forget with drugs and electicity and still had all the internal symptoms of my abuse for over 40 years w/o ever knowing about the abuse that caused it. I'd bet any unread lay person I knew over that time would say I showed no "signs" of abuse. Yet I was abused and was suffering greatly from it.

Just because abused domestic animals show signs of that abuse ion fear based biting or timidity doesn't extrapolate to an animal not having any outward sign of trauma wasn't or isn't suffering. Remember in the wild the animal must "look" healthy and fit. That appearance is more important than the fact of health or fitness to survival. I worked my whole life in agonizing pain yet never once told anyone how bad it really was. Because to avoid daily attacks in my personal death camp the Shelter if I showed any sign of the injuries I had I was immediatley attacked just like any wild animal would be.

_________________________
As Mark Twain once quipped, history may not repeat itself, but it does rhyme.

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#338805 - 08/22/10 05:59 PM Re: PTSD "Post Tramatic Stress Disorder" Info. [Re: kidneythis]
petercorbett Offline
Member
MaleSurvivor

Registered: 07/27/08
Posts: 2435
Loc: TEXAS
Hi, my brothers,

My brother, kidneythis, what you say about looking weak, sure hits home with me.

Like you it took me 55 years,to learn what caused it.

You said it well, for a whole bunch of us. Thanks.

"I will take that lost boys hand, and i will lead him from the depths of darkness, into the sunshine, forever into eternity,"

Heal well, my brothers, heal well.

Pete..Irishmoose.

_________________________
Working Boys' Home 10-14 yrs old, grades 5-8. 1949-1953
____________________________________________________________
A very humble alumni of the WOR Dahlonega, GA.
May 15-17 2009, Alta, Sep. 2009. Sequoia, 2010.
Hope Springs, 2010.


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